Ages 7 to 11 Reading List

Here are some books that our members recommend as suitable for this age group.

The Children's Book of Richard III

By Rosalind Adam

A colourful book, lots of illustrations with short paragraphs of text makes this accessible to good readers aged 7 +.
All the usual aspects of Richard’s life and death are treated fairly and in keeping with the historical record. The education of a nobleman, Richard’s older brother Edward’s two reigns, execution of the middle brother George, the Princes in the Tower, Bosworth, finding Richard’s skeleton under a car park and the scientific analysis to prove identity, and his reburial. Also, a balanced debate on good king-bad king.

Front cover of a book The Children's Book of Richard III

The Fox and The Ghost King

By Michael Morpurgo

A delightful tale of victory against all odds from master storyteller, Michael Morpurgo, lavishly illustrated by Michael Foreman.

“Every fox in the whole town, in the whole country just about, is a football fan… And we all have an impossible dream.”

In a cosy den under a garden shed lives a family of foxes. They love to watch football – all foxes do. But their favourite team keeps losing and losing, and it seems like things will never look up.

That is, until Daddy Fox finds the ghost of a king, buried underneath a car park. A king who wishes only to be free.

“Release me,” says the Ghost King, “and I can do anything. Just tell me your greatest wish.”

For these football-loving foxes, might everything be about to change…?

Front cover of a book: The Fox and the Ghost King by Michael Morpurgo

The Barley Hall - A Day in a Medieval Town House

This medieval house still stands in York and has been brought back to life by the York Acheaological Trust. You can visit the hall and take part in activities as they would have been 500 years ago,
The book is an introduction to everyday life in a medieval house: clothing, furniture, cooking food, drink, writing, bathing, beds, prayers, richly illustrated with both photographs and sketches.
Well worth reading and then visiting the hall for real.

Barley Hall A Day in a Medieval Town House

The Secret Diary of John Drawbridge

By Philip Ardagh

John Drawbridge has moved to Widemoat Castle to learn to become a knight. And there is a LOT to learn. . . How to charge with a lance on horseback without falling off. Why the spiral staircases always go up in a clockwise direction. How to defend the castle against invading parties. Why the plates served at banquets are made of stale bread (and why you shouldn’t eat them…). And much, MUCH more. So it’s no wonder that John decides to keep a diary (even if it is only an imaginary one…) of his time at the castle. Things REALLY liven up when the castle is attacked by an invading Welsh party – but can John foil their plot before it’s too late…?

Front cover of a book: The Secret Diary of John Drawbridge by Philip Ardagh

Richard III, I was There

By Stuart Hill

A story, well told, of the eleven-year-old Richard of Gloucester growing up in the household of the Earl of Warwick with his best friend Francis Lovell and his future wife, Ann. The two boys are taken to view their first battle at Hexham. We find out about the daily life inside Middleham Castle, the training of a young knight, horsemanship, weapons & armour and battle tactics.

Front cover of a book: I Was There: Richard III